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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Alternative medicine & Parkinson’s

Understanding Parkinson’s disease Throughout the years great improvements have been made in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, medications such as dopamine agonists and COMT inhibitors have greatly improved symptoms such as those associated with motor skills. Even with great advancements being made in the treatment for Parkinson’s many sufferers still suffer from symptoms and side effects that medication used in the treatment of the disease brings. In recent years another form of treatment has become a popular option for sufferers and this is in the form of alternative or complimentary medicine. When used alongside the more traditional methods, complimentary medicine can prove beneficial to the sufferer of Parkinson’s.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Deep Brain Stimulation and Other Surgery for Parkinson’s Disease

When medication has ceased to be effective or the side effects from these drugs have become no longer tolerable, surgery might be an option your Doctor will consider and advise to help alleviate your symptoms and improve your quality of life. However not all sufferers of Parkinson’s will be a candidate for surgery, an example would be a person who didn’t respond very well to Levodopa treatment.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Parkinson’s disease glossary

Understanding Parkinson’s disease Acetylcholine A classical neurotransmitter found in the basal ganglia and throughout the body. An imbalance between the neurotransmitters acetylcholine and dopamine is associated with some of the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) for example, tremor and rigidity. Action tremor Involuntary movement of a limb after initiation of action. Akinesia A sharp decline in motor performance with complete loss of the ability to initiate voluntary movement and a loss of automatic movements, such as blinking.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Depression & Parkinson’s

Understanding Parkinson’s disease Depression is a serious illness that can affect anyone at anytime in their life, it brings about feelings of sadness, hopelessness, anxiety and fatigue, people who suffer from Parkinson’s disease not only have to contend with the disease itself but over 50% of people suffering will also have to contend with depression too. There is no clear reason which determines why those suffering from Parkinson’s have depression, though Parkinson’s is a debilitating, progressive disease in itself which when first diagnosed many people find hard to digest.