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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Mental Health Problems and Depression in Parkinson’s Disease

There are certain mental problems which have been associated with Parkinson’s disease as symptoms of the disease. These include hallucinations, paranoia and delusions, some of which are thought to be brought on by the side effects of medication while others may be complications of the disease itself. Depression is another mental health problem that is commonly seen in Parkinson’s disease often due to the impact this disease has on a person’s life.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Self help for people with Parkinson’s

Understanding Parkinson’s disease There are many things a person can do to help both themselves and their doctor when suffering from Parkinson’s disease, joining a support group, taking a regular form of exercise plan and maintaining a healthy diet are just some of the possibilities. Support groups Support groups can play a crucial role in the emotional aspect of a sufferer’s life and how they cope with living with the disease. Support groups provide a way of asking questions, sharing stories and experiences of the disease and for developing friendships with people in the same predicament as you. In addition to live support groups several forums can be found online which provide help, support and advice for those suffering from Parkinson’s and the family of those suffering.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease

Some of the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease will affect your muscles and joints, they will cause the sufferer to move more slowly and feel weakness, tightness and pain in the joints and muscles. There is however a lot that can be done to alleviate these symptoms and assist a person to manage the condition. Physical, occupational and speech therapy can assist accordingly.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Parkinson’s, speech therapy & self help

Understanding Parkinson’s disease Having difficulty in both speaking and swallowing are just two of the debilitating symptoms which are brought on by Parkinson’s disease, however they are two symptoms which if the patients attends speech therapy can be helped greatly. Over the last few years advancements in this area of the disease have come forth and a new programme has been developed with the aim of helping those with Dysarthria, which is difficulty in speaking and Dysphagia which is difficulty in swallowing. The new programme, The Lee Silverman voice therapy programme can now provide significant help for those with these two symptoms of Parkinson’s, besides attending therapy there are also several ways in which you can help yourself.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Living with Parkinson’s Disease and Self Help Steps

There are several things which you can do to help yourself achieve maximum wellness when you have been diagnosed as having Parkinson’s disease. Trying to maintain a positive outlook is perhaps the most valuable while trying to maintain a balance between living as normal a life as possible without pushing yourself too hard and recognising your limitations. It is also wise to make use and take advantage of physical, occupational and speech therapies which are available to you as these can make such a difference to how you are able to maintain your independence yourself.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Parkinson’s Disease FAQ

It is always advisable to discuss Parkinson’s disease with a medical professional, particularly a specialist with in-depth knowledge of the disease. Further consultation with a psychiatrist is also advisable. Here are the answers to some of the common questions about Parkinson’s disease, beyond the articles covering the subject on this website. Is Parkinson’s disease hereditary? Parkinson’s disease is not generally thought to be a hereditary disease in that it doesn’t get passed from one generation to another. However, the risk of getting the disease if someone in your family has it is slightly increased. Genetic factors are linked this way just as heart disease and diabetes are, though the exact reason why genetic factors are increased remains unclear. Do only old people get Parkinson’s disease? While Parkinson’s disease is more prevalent in people aged over [… Read More]

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Exercise therapy for people with Parkinson’s

Understanding Parkinson’s disease Exercise can be beneficial to those suffering from Parkinson’s disease both psychologically and physically, because of the way the disease affects the person’s ability to move by doing regular exercise it will help to keep the patient’s limbs and joints supple, improve their flexibility and help to keep their muscles strong. Although exercise cannot stop the disease from progressing it can make a big difference to the person’s lifestyle in that it can help to improve their balance, help them to correct problems with their gait and help to strengthen muscles which are associated with speaking and swallowing.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Parkinson’s Disease Risk Factors and Diagnosis

Unlike other diseases, there is no specific diagnostic investigation that will confirm a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease or predict who will develop the disease for all cases. Therefore routine screening is not necessary. However, understanding the risk factors may assist with assessing those individuals with a greater chance of developing Parkinson’s disease.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s

Understanding Parkinson’s disease Deep brain stimulation is a surgical procedure which can help greatly with the symptoms most commonly associated with Parkinson’s disease such as rigidity, stiffness, slowed movement and problems with walking and movement. However deep brain stimulation at the present is only an option for those sufferers whose medication doesn’t adequately control their symptoms. What’s involved with deep brain stimulation? The surgery is performed by inserting a battery operated device which is called a neurostimulator, the stimulator then sends out pulses to targeted areas of the brain that control the patients movement. This in turn blocks the abnormal brain signals which cause the tremors commonly associated with Parkinson’s disease.

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Parkinson's Disease FAQ

Coping with Parkinson’s and Caregiver’s Guide

Denial is often a major barrier when the person is first diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, they will often refuse to admit they have the disease and refuse to even tell friends and family particularly if the disease is diagnosed in a younger person. The thought of going from a well individual to someone with a progressive chronic illness such as Parkinson’s is often unthinkable and unbearable for them.